News

'Project Fastball' sets speed record for moving data in computer networks

March 9, 2006- 
ARMONK, N.Y. — IBM announced today that it has scored a fundamental performance breakthrough in the way that massive computer networks access and share information. The historic results were achieved on the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program’s Purple supercomputer – the third most powerful supercomputer in the world, according to the Top500 ranking.  ASC Purple, located at...

New class of metal nitrides could lead to more durable semiconductors

March 2, 2006- 
LIVERMORE, Calif. — New research shows that a novel class of nitrides made from noble metals can be synthesized under extreme conditions and are likely to have unusual or even unique properties that would be useful in semiconductor, superconductor and corrosion-resistant devices. Historically, transition metal nitrides are fundamentally and technologically important because of their...

Researchers mimic high-pressure form of ice found in giant icy moons

March 2, 2006- 
LIVERMORE, Calif. — That everyday ice you use to chill your glass of lemonade has helped researchers better understand the internal structure of icy moons in the far reaches of the solar system. A research team has demonstrated a new kind of “creep,” or flow, in a high-pressure form of ice by creating in a laboratory the conditions of pressure, temperature, stress, and grain size that...

LLNL statement on the Department of Energy�Price-Anderson Citation

Feb. 27, 2006- 
Our Laboratory has been working aggressively over the past year to correct and remedy the situations cited today by the Department of Energy/Price-Anderson Enforcement Office. Examples are: The self-initiated programmatic shutdown of the Laboratory’s Superblock Facility in January 2005 to address configuration management and safety related issues.  Since then, work has been resumed...

Volcanoes helped slow ocean warming trend, researchers find

Feb. 8, 2006- 
LIVERMORE, Calif. — Ocean temperatures might have risen even higher during the last century if it weren't for volcanoes that spewed ashes and aerosols into the upper atmosphere, researchers have found. The eruptions also offset a large percentage of sea level rise caused by human activity. Using 12 new state-of-the-art climate models, the researchers found that ocean warming and sea...

New climate research reveals growing risk of water shortages and flooding in California

Feb. 6, 2006- 
LIVERMORE, Calif. — If the world continues to burn greenhouse gases, California may have an increased risk of winter floods and summer water shortages, even within the same year. This scenario may be more severe in future El Niño years. New research by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists shows that global warming is likely to change river flows in ways that may...

Astronomers discover distant, icy Earth-like planet

Jan. 25, 2006- 
An international team of astrophysicists has discovered a new planet five times the size of Earth, the smallest extrasolar planet revealed to date outside of our solar system. Using a network of telescopes scattered across the globe, the group discovered the extrasolar planet is more Earth-like than any other planet found so far. It circles its parent star every 10 years. The discovery...

Livermore researchers shed new light on the physical properties of carbon

Jan. 23, 2006- 
LIVERMORE, Calif. — A team based in Livermore has shed some new light on the phase diagram of carbon at high pressure and temperature. In particular, the authors determined the solid/liquid and solid/solid phase boundaries for pressures up to 20 million Earth atmospheres and more than 10,000 degrees Kelvin. The simulations provide results on the physical properties of carbon, which are...

Superheated nanotubes gain strength as they stretch, researchers find

Jan. 18, 2006- 
LIVERMORE, Calif. — Carbon nanotubes used in the electronics for such devices as cell phones might have a longer life thanks to a strengthening technique pioneered by researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Boston College and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).  A single-walled carbon nanotube heated to more than 3,600 degrees Fahrenheit became nearly...

Wayne Shotts, LLNL's deputy director for Operations, announces plans to retire

Jan. 17, 2006- 
LIVERMORE, Calif. — Dr. Wayne Shotts, LLNL’s deputy director for Operations, has announced his plans to retire from the Laboratory, effective March 1. Shotts has led the Laboratory’s operational programs since January 2005, and his career spans more than 31 years of work in physics, defense and nuclear technologies, nonproliferation, arms control, international security and homeland...

DOE JGI to decode DNA of soybean, a key alternative energy source

Jan. 17, 2006- 
WASHINGTON, D.C. — The U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Energy announced Monday they will share resources and coordinate the study of plant and microbial genomics, and the Department of Energy will tackle the sequencing of the soybean genome as the first project resulting from the agreement. “This agreement demonstrates a joint commitment to support high-quality genomics research and...

Livermore researchers find new source of coherent light

Jan. 13, 2006- 
LIVERMORE, Calif. — With the exception of lasers and free-electron lasers, there hasn’t been another fundamental way to produce coherent light for close to 50 years. But a group of researchers from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have found a new source of coherent optical radiation that is distinct from lasers and free-electron lasers...

DOE JGI report highlights energy and environmental achievements

Jan. 10, 2006- 
WALNUT CREEK, Calif. — The U.S. Department of Energy’s investment in large-scale genome sequencing is paying dividends, with powerful implications for the nation’s energy and environmental cleanup needs, according to a report just released by the DOE Joint Genome Institute. As the leading national user facility targeting microbes and microbial communities, plants, and aquatic organisms...

Lab's annual report finds no adverse impact on environment

Jan. 4, 2006- 
LIVERMORE, Calif. — Environmental monitoring of 2004 operations for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory indicates no adverse impact to public health or the environment. The findings are presented in the 2004 Site Annual Environmental Report. The report assesses the impact of LLNL operations on the environment, summarizes regulatory compliance and records results of environmental...

Astronomers detect echoes from ancient supernovae

Dec. 21, 2005- 
A team of astronomers has found faint visible “echoes” of three ancient supernovae by detecting centuries-old light reflected by interstellar gas clouds hundreds of light-years removed from the original explosions.Located in a nearby galaxy in the southern skies, the three exploding stars flashed into short-lived brilliance at least two centuries ago, and probably longer. The oldest is likely...

Models show growing more forests in temperate regions could contribute to global warming

Dec. 5, 2005- 
LIVERMORE, Calif. — Planting trees across the United States and Europe to absorb some of the carbon dioxide emitted by the burning of fossil fuels may just outweigh the positive effects of sequestering that CO². In theory, growing a forest may sound like a good idea to fight global warming, but in temperate regions, such as the United States, those trees also would soak up sunlight...

Precise new measurement tests key physics theory under extreme conditions

Dec. 2, 2005- 
LIVERMORE, Calif. — A new measurement in quantum electrodynamics – an extension of quantum mechanics – is 10 times more precise than any recent measurements. Quantum electrodynamics, or QED, is one of the most successful theories in physics and considered one of the fundamental theories of nature. QED describes the interaction of matter with photons, in which particles and antiparticles...

First NIF experiments validate computer simulations on road to ignition

Dec. 1, 2005- 
LIVERMORE, Calif. — Researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have successfully conducted an important round of successful laser experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF), validating key computer simulations and theoretical projections relevant to the plasma and X-ray environment necessary to achieve ignition. NIF, which is more than 80 percent complete, is a...

Award named for noted LLNL physicist Kennedy Reed

Dec. 1, 2005- 
LIVERMORE, Calif. — The California Section of the American Physical Society has named a student award for noted Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory physicist Kennedy Reed. During the 2005 fall meeting of the California Section of APS, the Kennedy Reed Award for Best Theoretical Research was given to three graduate students and/or postdoctoral researchers. The award consists of three...

Breakthrough 3D simulations win prestigious 2005 Gordon Bell Prize

Nov. 30, 2005- 
A team of scientists led by physicist Fred Streitz has been awarded the 2005 Gordon Bell Prize for pioneering materials science simulations conducted on the world’s fastest supercomputer at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The winner was announced at the conclusion of the Supercomputing 2005 conference held earlier this month in Seattle, Wash. Other team members included James...