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Patents

Nondegenerate Optical Parametric Chirped-Pulse Amplifier
Igor Jovanovic, Christopher A. Ebbers
U.S. Patent 6,870,664 B2
March 22, 2005
This system provides input pump and single pulses. A first dichroic beam splitter is highly reflective for the input signal pulse and highly transmissive for the input pump pulse. A first optical-parametric amplifier nonlinear crystal transfers part of the energy from the input pump pulse to the input signal pulse resulting in a first amplified signal pulse and a first depleted pump pulse. A second dichroic beam splitter is highly reflective for the first amplified signal pulse and highly transmissive for the first depleted pump pulse. A second optical-parametric amplifier nonlinear crystal transfers part of the energy from the first depleted pump pulse to the first amplified signal pulse resulting in a second amplified signal pulse and a second depleted pump pulse. A third dichroic beam splitter receives the second amplified signal pulse and the second depleted pump pulse. The second depleted pump pulse is discarded.

Porous Protective Solid-Phase Micro-Extractor Sheath
Brian D. Andresen, Erik Randich
U.S. Patent 6,871,556 B2
March 29, 2005
A porous protective sheath for active extraction media used in solid-phase microextraction permits exposure of the media to the environment without the necessity of extending a fragile coated fiber from a protective tube or needle. Subsequently, the sheath can pierce and seal using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry septums, allowing direct injection of samples into inlet ports of analytical equipment. Using a porous protective sheath, within which the active extraction media is contained, mitigates the problems of (1) fiber breakage while the fiber is extended during sampling, (2) active media-coating loss caused by physical contact of the bare fiber with the sampling environment, and (3) coating slough-off during fiber extension and retraction operations caused by rubbing action between the fiber and protective needle or tube.

Shape-Memory Alloy and Shape-Memory Polymer Tools
Kirk P. Seward, Peter A. Krulevitch
U.S. Patent 6,872,433 B2
March 29, 2005
Composite shape-memory alloy (SMA), shape-memory polymer (SMP), and combinations of SMA and SMP are used to produce microelectromechanical tools, such as catheter distal tips and actuators, for minimally invasive techniques including microsurgery. Applications for these tools include a method for reversible fine-positioning of a catheter tip; a method for reversible fine-positioning of tools or therapeutic catheters by a guide catheter; a method for bending articulation through the body’s vasculature; methods for controlled stent delivery, deployment, and repositioning; and catheters with variable modulus, vibration mode, inchworm capability, or articulated tips. These actuators and catheter tips are bistable and opportune for in vivo usage because the materials are biocompatible and convenient for intravascular use and other minimally invasive techniques.

Semiconductor Material and Method for Enhancing Solubility of a Dopant Therein
Babak Sadigh, Thomas J. Lenosky, Tomás Díaz de la Rubia, Martin Giles, Maria-Jose Caturla, Vidvuds Ozolins, Mark Asta, Silva Theiss, Majeed Foad, Andrew Quong
U.S. Patent 6,872,455 B2
March 29, 2005
A method for enhancing the equilibrium solubility of boron and indium in silicon involves first-principles quantum-mechanical calculations to determine the temperature dependence of the equilibrium solubility of two important p-type dopants in silicon, namely boron and indium, under various strain conditions. The equilibrium thermodynamic solubility of size-mismatched impurities, such as boron and indium in silicon, can be raised significantly if the silicon substrate is strained appropriately. For example, for boron, a 1-percent compressive strain raises the equilibrium solution by 100 percent at 1100°C. For indium, a 1-percent tensile strain at 1,100°C enhances the solubility by 200 percent.

Hybrid Chirped-Pulse Amplification
Christopher P. J. Barty, Igor Jovanovic
U.S. Patent 6,873,454 B2
March 29, 2005
This hybrid chirped-pulse amplification system features a short-pulse oscillator. The oscillator pulse is stretched to produce an oscillator seed pulse. A pump laser generates a pump-laser pulse. The stretched oscillator-seed pulse and the pump-laser pulse are directed into an optical-parametric amplifier, producing an output-amplified signal pulse and an output-unconverted pump pulse. The output-amplified signal pulse and the output laser pulse of the optical-parametric amplifier are directed into a laser amplifier producing a laser amplifier output pulse. The laser amplifier output pulse is compressed to produce a recompressed hybrid chirped pulse.

Liposuction Cannula Device and Method
Paul J. Weber, Steven R. Visuri, Matthew J. Everett, Luiz B. Da Silva, Alwin H. Kolster
U.S. Patent 6,875,207 B2
April 5, 2005
This liposuction apparatus has an optional sonic or ultrasonic source. The sonic or ultrasonic source has an axial lumen passage in which the shaft can be made to reciprocate (oscillate) nonrectilinearly. The apparatus may also use rectilinear reciprocation motion and ultrasonic motion or energy along its shaft. The liposuction apparatus has many advantages such as a nonrectilinear single-shaft reciprocating cannula, a sonic or ultrasonic energy that is delivered to the distal tip, and a rectilinear reciprocating cannula with ultrasonic energy along the shaft from the handle. All of these reciprocating components are powered by excess vacuum capacity in the liposuction’s aspirator (suction engine). Three primary sources of energy are applied to the cannula shaft: the oscillating surgeon’s arm motion of approximately 1 to 2 hertz; the reciprocating motion of about 100 hertz; and the optional concomitant motion delivered by the ultrasonic energy of, for example, 25 kilohertz.

Light Metal Explosives and Propellants
Lowell L. Wood, Muriel Y. Ishikawa, John H. Nuckolls, Philip F. Pagoria, James A. Viecelli
U.S. Patent 6,875,294 B2
April 5, 2005
These light metal explosives, pyrotechnics, and propellants (LME&Ps) are composed of a light metal component such as lithium, boron, beryllium, or their hydrides. They may also be composed of intermetallic compounds and alloys containing these elements as well as an oxidizer component containing a classic explosive, such as CL-20, or a nonexplosive oxidizer, such as lithium perchlorate, or combinations thereof. LME&P formulations may have light metal particles and oxidizer particles ranging in size from 0.01 to 1,000 micrometers.

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UCRL-52000-05-6 | June 6, 2005