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  • Front Matter
    The Laboratory in the News
    Commentary by Wayne Shotts
  • Feature Articles
    Simulations to Save Time, Money, and Lives
    The Secrets of Crystal Growth
  • Research Highlights
    Addressing a Cold War Legacy with a New Way to Produce TATB
    DNA Sequencing: The Next Step in the Search for Genes
  • Patents and Awards
  • Abstracts (see below)

  • Below are files offered in Portable Document Format. Click on highlighted text to download.
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    View the Entire November 1996 Issue in PDF (1403K)

    Feature Articles

  • Simulations to Save Time, Money, and Lives

    (pdf file, 468K)

    The Laboratory's Conflict Simulation Laboratory (CSL) has been developing computerized programs to simulate combat and other conflicts since 1974. All branches of the military use these systems for training purposes and to prepare for operations as diverse as the 1989 invasion of Panama and peacekeeping in Somalia. The CSL is presently continuing development of the Joint Tactical Simulation (JTS) and recently began work on the Joint Conflict and Tactical Simulation (JCATS) program for the Joint Chiefs of Staff. The Army is still using the CSL's first model, Janus.

    Feature Article

  • The Secrets of Crystal Growth

    (pdf file, 550K)

    Lawrence Livermore researchers are using the atomic-force microscope (AFM) to elucidate the growth mechanisms and three-dimensional structures of widely different solution-based crystals on the nanometer (billionth-of-a-meter) scale. Much of the AFM work has been in support of the Laser Programs' need to better understand KDP (potassium dihydrogen phosphate) crystal growth because of its direct impact on advanced lasers such as the National Ignition Facility. A second avenue of research has focused on the growth of solution-based crystals of biological macromolecules, specifically the protein canavalin and the satellite tobacco mosaic virus. The AFM images have revealed how solution-based crystals grow and how they are affected by impurities, defects, and solution conditions. The results are likely to affect many disciplines and technologies, from pharmaceuticals to materials synthesis.


    Research Highlight

  • Addressing a Cold War Legacy with a New Way to Produce TATB
  • DNA Sequencing: The Next Step in the Search for Genes
  • (pdf file, 495K)


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