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September Science and Technology Review cover

September
2001

The Laboratory in the News

Technology Transfer Takes a Team
Commentary by Jan Tulk

Zeroing In on Genes
With Gene Recovery Microdissection, sequencing an entire genome to find its genes will no longer be necessary.

Big Glass for a Big Laser
Together, Livermore and two leading laser glass producers have developed a revolutionary new method for making big pieces of high-quality laser glass.

Lasershot Makes Its Mark
The Lasershot Marking System creates permanent, high-resolution identification marks on safety-critical metal parts, without weakening the part.

Tracking the Global Spread of Advanced Technologies
The Center for Global Security Research takes on the challenge of analyzing and raising awareness of the potential national security threats posed by advances in science and technology.

Patents and Awards

 


Below are print-friendly files offered in Portable Document Format. Click on highlighted text to download.
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View the Entire July/August 2001 Issue in PDF (5.6MB)

  • Zeroing In on Genes
  • (pdf file, 529k)
    With Gene Recovery Microdissection, sequencing an entire genome to find its genes will no longer be necessary.

  • Big Glass for a Big Laser
  • (pdf file, 59k)
    Together, Livermore and two leading laser glass producers have developed a revolutionary new method for making big pieces of high-quality laser glass.

  • Lasershot Makes Its Mark
  • (pdf file, 1.5MB)
    The Lasershot Marking System creates permanent, high-resolution identification marks on safety-critical metal parts, without weakening the part.

  • Tracking the Global Spread of Advanced Technologies
  • (pdf file, 2M)
    Lawrence Livermore’s Center for Global Security Research (CGSR) has been sponsoring workshops involving some of the brightest minds in science and technology, government, and academia. The main focus of recent workshops was the rapid global spread of new technologies and their potential effect on national security. Last year, the CGSR brought together experts to discuss technology-driven threats to the U.S. and its allies in the 2015 to 2020 timeframe. Participants studied how the Internet, migration, multinational corporations, and global research collaborations are all helping to provide every nation as well as small extremist groups access to technical knowledge. The series of workshops, entitled “After Globalization: Future Security in a Technology-Rich World,” resulted in a ranking of long-range threats to the U.S. An ongoing CGSR project titled “Whither Deterrence?” is examining the future of deterrence in response to the new threat scenarios. Other workshops and studies carry on the CGSR tradition of focusing on the interplay between policy and technology.



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