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Patents

Edge-Facet-Pumped, Multi-Aperture, Thin-Disk Laser Geometry for Very High Average Power Output Scaling
Luis E. Zapata
U.S. Patent 6,834,070 B2
December 21, 2004
The average power output of a laser is scaled by increasing the transverse dimension of the gain medium while proportionately increasing the thickness of an index-matched light guide. Strategic facets cut at the edges of the laminated gain medium provide a method by which the pump light is trapped and repeatedly passed through the gain medium. Spontaneous emission escapes the laser volume via these facets. A multifaceted disk geometry with grooves cut into the thickness of the gain medium is optimized to passively reject spontaneous emission generated within the laser material, which would otherwise be trapped and amplified within the high-index composite disk. This geometry allows the useful size of the laser aperture to be increased, enabling the average laser output power to be scaled.

Impedance Measurements for Detecting Pathogens Attached to Antibodies
Robin R. Miles, Kodumudi S. Venkateswaran, Christopher K. Fuller
U.S. Patent 6,835,552 B2
December 28, 2004
Impedance measurements are used to detect pathogens attached to antibody-coated beads. In a fluidic device, antibodies are immobilized on the surface of a patterned, interdigitated electrode. Pathogens in a sample fluid streaming past the electrode attach to the immobilized antibodies, producing a change in impedance between two adjacent electrodes. This impedance change is measured and used to detect the presence of a pathogen. The signal can be amplified by adding beads coated with antibodies. When these beads stick to the pathogen, they cause a greater change in the impedance between the two adjacent electrodes.

Method and System for Ultra-Precision Positioning
Richard C. Montesanti, Stanley F. Locke, Samuel L. Thompson
U.S. Patent 6,839,970 B2
January 11, 2005
An apparatus and method is disclosed for ultraprecision positioning. A slide base provides a foundational support. A slide plate moves with respect to the slide base along a first geometric axis. Either a ball screw or a piezoelectric actuator, working separately or in conjunction, displaces the slide plate with respect to the slide base along the first geometric axis. A linking device directs a primary force vector into a centerline of the ball screw. The linking device consists of a first link that directs a portion of the primary force vector to an apex point, located along the centerline of the ball screw, and a second link that directs another portion of the primary force vector to the apex point. A set of rails, oriented parallel to the centerline of the ball screw, direct movement of the slide plate with respect to the slide base along the first geometric axis and is positioned such that the apex point falls within a geometric plane formed by the rails. The slide base, slide plate, ball screw, and linking device together form a slide assembly. Multiple slide assemblies can be distributed about a platform. In such a configuration, the platform may be raised and lowered or tilted by jointly or independently displacing the slide plates.

Quantitation of Absorbed or Deposited Materials on a Substrate That Measures Energy Deposition
Patrick G. Grant, Olgica Bakajin, John S. Vogel, Graham Bench
U.S. Patent 6,844,543 B2
January 18, 2005
This invention provides a system and method for measuring an energy differential that correlates to quantitative measurement for a mass of an applied localized material. Such a system and method are compatible with other methods of analysis, such as quantitating the elemental or isotopic content, identifying the material, or using the material in biochemical analyses.

Colloidal Spray Method for Low-Cost Thin-Coating Deposition
Ai-Quoc Pham, Robert S. Glass, Tae H. Lee
U.S. Patent 6,846,558 B2
January 25, 2005
A dense or porous coating of material is deposited onto a substrate by forcing a colloidal suspension through an ultrasonic nebulizer and spraying a fine mist of particles in a carrier medium onto a sufficiently heated substrate. The spraying rate is essentially matched to the evaporation rate of the carrier liquid from the substrate to produce a coating that is uniformly distributed over the surface of the substrate. Following deposition to a sufficient coating thickness, a single sintering step may be used to produce a dense ceramic coating. With this method, coatings ranging in thickness from about one to several hundred micrometers can be obtained. When a plurality of compounds is used in the colloidal suspension, coatings of mixed composition can be obtained. When a plurality of solutions, separate pumps, and a single or multiple ultrasonic nebulizer(s) are used and the individual pumping rates or the concentrations of the solutions are varied, a coating of mixed and discontinuously graded or continuously graded layers may be obtained. This method is particularly useful for depositing ceramic coatings. Dense ceramic coating materials on porous substrates are useful in providing improved electrode performance in devices such as high-power-density solid-oxide fuel cells. Dense ceramic coatings obtained by this method are also useful for other items, such as gas turbine blade coatings, sensors, and steam electrolyzers. The method has general use in the preparation of systems requiring durable and chemically resistant coatings or coatings having other specific chemical or physics properties.

Method for Detecting Pathogens Attached to Specific Antibodies
Robin R. Miles, Kodumudi S. Venkateswaran, Christopher K. Fuller
U.S. Patent 6,846,639 B2
January 25, 2005
This method uses impedance measurements to detect the presence of pathogens attached to antibody-coated beads. In a fluidic device, antibodies are immobilized on the surface of a patterned, interdigitated electrode. Pathogens in a sample fluid streaming past the electrode attach to the immobilized antibodies, which produces a change in impedance between two adjacent electrodes. The impedance change is measured and then used to detect the presence of a pathogen. To amplify the signal, beads coated with antibodies are introduced. The beads stick to the pathogen, causing a greater change in impedance between the two adjacent electrodes.

Awards



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UCRL-52000-05-4 | April 14, 2005