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April 2001

The Laboratory in the News

Computer Modeling Advances Bioscience
Commentary by Bert Weinstein

A New Kind of Biological Research
Researchers are using advanced computer simulations to reveal the mechanisms of a host of biological phenomena.

The World's Most Accurate Lathe
Used to make large mirrors for the National Aeronautical and Space Administration and the Department of Defense, Livermore's Large Optics Diamond Turning Machine is over 1,000 times more accurate than a conventional machine tool.

Leading the Attack on Cancer
Scientists from Lawrence Livermore and the University of California at Davis Cancer Center are collaborating on research to find better ways to prevent, detect, diagnose, and treat cancer.

Electronic Memory Goes High Rise
Stackable magnetic random access memory may improve computer performance.

Patents and Awards

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Below are print-friendly files offered in Portable Document Format. Click on highlighted text to download.
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View the Entire April 2001 Issue in PDF (6.7MB)

  • A New Kind of Biological Reasearch
  • (pdf file, 2.5MB)
    Lawrence Livermore's Computational Biology Group is linking advanced computer simulations to laboratory experiments. The result is new explanations of biological phenomena at an unprecedented level of detail. The simulations provide a "virtual microscope" that combines powerful computers with software programs and applies them to the structures and energetics of biological molecules. The most advanced form of the simulations, called first-principles molecular dynamics, uses quantum mechanical forces to simulate biochemical processes. The simulations often run on Livermore's teraops (trillion operations per second) supercomputers, some of the most powerful in the world. The Computational Biology Group is involved in a wide range of projects that includes studies of the action of anticancer drugs, the DNA-binding properties of food mutagens, the mechanisms of DNA repair enzymes, and the biophysics of DNA base pairing.

  • The World's Most Accurate Lathe
  • (pdf file, 1.5MB)

  • Leading the Attack on Cancer
  • (pdf file, 1MB)

  • Electronic Memory Goes High Rise
  • (pdf file, 529k)



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