• Front Matter
    The Laboratory in the News

    Commentary by Hal Graboske

  • Featured Article
    A Better Picture of Aging Materials


  • Research Highlights
    Researchers Determine Chernobyl
    Liquidator's Exposure

    Target Chamber's Dedication Marks
    a Giant Milestone

  • Patents and Awards

  • Abstract (see below)




  • Below are files offered in Portable Document Format. Click on highlighted text to download.
    How to view PDF files //S&TR Home Page // LLNL Home Page

    View the Entire September 1999 Issue in PDF (2.8MB)

  • A Better Picture of Aging Materials

    (pdf file, 1.3MB)

    The shelf life of a nuclear weapon was not an issue until the early 1990s when the U.S. stopped developing and testing nuclear weapons. Existing weapons are expected to remain operational for several decades beyond their originally designed lifetime. Livermore is studying the aging processes of the many materials that make up a nuclear weapon, such as high explosives, metals, and organic materials, with the goal of developing models that predict the lifetime of individual materials as well as of the entire weapon system. Some experiments are examining the fundamental nature of the materials, while others are studying weapons taken from the stockpile to see how aging is progressing. The process of compiling this data into predictive models is just beginning.


    Research Highlights

  • Researchers Determine Chernobyl Liquidator's Exposure
  • Target Chamber's Dedication Marks a Giant Milestone
  • (pdf file, 1.1MB)


    Return to S&TR 1999 // S&TR Homepage


    For more information about S&TR contact:
    S&TR, str-mail@llnl.gov )

    LLNL Homepage and LLNL Disclaimers

    UCRL-52000