News

LLNL team develops real-time diagnostic for Liquid Metal Jetting 3D printing

Nov. 1, 2021- 
As 3D printing continues to grow and evolve, diagnostics capable of monitoring builds in real-time have become essential tools for producing quality parts, particularly in emerging printing technologies such as Liquid Metal Jetting (LMJ). In LMJ, tiny molten metal droplets are ejected from a nozzle at high speeds to 3D print a part in layers, similar to inkjet printers on the consumer...

LLNL researchers garner three awards among top 100 industrial inventions

Oct. 29, 2021- 
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists and engineers have collected three awards among the top 100 industrial inventions worldwide. The trade journal R&D World Magazine announced the winners of the awards, often called the “Oscars of invention,” during a three-day virtual ceremony — Oct. 19-21 — and on the magazine’s website. With this year’s results, the Laboratory...

New hydrogen storage material steps on the gas

Oct. 28, 2021- 
Hydrogen is increasingly viewed as essential to a sustainable world energy economy because it can store surplus renewable power, decarbonize transportation and serve as a zero-emission energy carrier. However, conventional high-pressure or cryogenic storage pose significant technical and engineering challenges. To overcome these challenges, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)...

Nuclear weapons technology for a new generation of policymakers

Oct. 27, 2021- 
Policymaking for nuclear security requires a strong grasp of the associated technical matters. That grasp came naturally in the early decades of the nuclear era, when scientists and engineers were deeply engaged in policymaking. Yet in the last few decades, the scientists and engineers who conceived, built and executed the programs that created the existing U.S. nuclear deterrent faded...

New research looks at process of magnetic flux generation in ICF implosions

Oct. 27, 2021- 
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers now have a better understanding on how strong the magnetic fields are in an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world’s most energetic laser. The researchers described their findings a paper published in Physics of Plasmas with LLNL scientists Chris Walsh serving as lead...

Tube-in-tube structure going strong

Oct. 26, 2021- 
Similar to grass stems, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists have created nanostrut-connected tube-in-tubes that enable stronger low-density structural materials. Porous materials with engineered stretching-dominated lattice designs, which offer attractive mechanical properties with ultra-light weight and large surface area for wide-ranging applications, have recently...

LLNL joins Human Vaccines Project to accelerate vaccine development and understanding of immune response

Oct. 21, 2021- 
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has joined the international Human Vaccines Project (HVP), bringing Lab expertise and computing resources to the consortium to aid development of a universal coronavirus vaccine and improve understanding of immune response. The HVP is a nonprofit, public-private partnership with a mission to decode the human immune system and accelerate the...

Cancer therapies and nuclear material detection get a boost from newly discovered protein

Oct. 20, 2021- 
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Penn State scientists have demonstrated how a protein can be recovered and purified for radioactive metals like actinium that could be beneficial for both next-generation drugs used in cancer therapies and the detection of nuclear activities. Radioactive metals hold unique and essential places in a variety of medical imaging and...

Early access systems at LLNL mark progress toward El Capitan

Oct. 20, 2021- 
Though the arrival of the exascale supercomputer El Capitan at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is still almost two years away, teams of code developers are busy working on predecessor systems to ensure critical applications are ready for Day One. Delivered in February, the “RZNevada” early-access system is providing experts at the National Nuclear Security Administration...

Lawrence Livermore Research Slam! winners advance to Bay Area competition

Oct. 19, 2021- 
The top winners of the recent Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Research Slam!, a speaking competition for postdocs, will advance to the Bay Area Research SLAM set for Thursday, Oct. 28. The Bay Area Research SLAM! is a collaboration between the Bay Area’s national labs (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, LLNL, Sandia National Laboratories and SLAC National Accelerator...

LLNL engineers deliver final optical components for world’s newest telescope: the Vera C. Rubin Observatory

Oct. 19, 2021- 
For much of the past decade, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers have been designing major optical components for the world’s newest telescope, while their industrial partners have fabricated the components. Now, with the September shipment of the last of six optical filters for the telescope’s camera to the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in Menlo Park, the...

Three LLNL scientists honored as APS fellows

Oct. 19, 2021- 
Three Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) physicists have been selected as 2021 fellows of the American Physical Society (APS). The new fellows represent a selection of physics expertise, ranging from intense laser-matter interactions and inertial fusion energy science to leading the development of edge simulation models and codes to pioneering new regimes of warm dense matter...

Powering up: LLNL prepares for exascale with massive energy and water upgrade

Oct. 18, 2021- 
A supercomputer doesn’t just magically appear, especially one as large and as fast as Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s upcoming exascale-class behemoth El Capitan. At peak usage, El Capitan — projected to be the world’s most powerful computer by 2023 — will require about as much energy as a small city, so it takes years of planning, infrastructure upgrades and an entirely new way of...

Updated exascale system for earth simulations

Oct. 14, 2021- 
A new version of the Energy Exascale Earth System Model (E3SM) is two times faster than its earlier version released in 2018. Earth system models have weather-scale resolution and use advanced computers to simulate aspects of Earth’s variability and anticipate decadal changes that will critically impact the U.S. energy sector in coming years. Version 2 of the Energy Exascale Earth...

Four graduate students selected as Graduate Student Research Program recipients

Oct. 13, 2021- 
Four graduate  awardees selected by the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Science Graduate Student Research (SCGSR) program’s 2021 Solicitation 1 cycle will be hosted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The four graduate students are among 65 individuals representing 29 states who will conduct research at various DOE national laboratories. The students hosted by...

Making it count: Rebuilding infrastructure at the Nuclear Counting Facility

Oct. 8, 2021- 
When Daniel Martin put the finishing touches on an autonomous vehicle robot, complete with an ultrasonic sensor to detect and evade obstacles, he knew he wanted to become an engineer. A high school student at the time, he was fascinated by the design and functionality of robots. Fast forward several years, and Martin is now a second-year electrical engineering Ph.D. student at the University...

LLNL researchers observe laser-driven tin ejecta microjet interactions

Oct. 7, 2021- 
The experimental observations of high-velocity particle-laden flow interactions has been sparse, given the difficulty of generating high-velocity flows of many particles. These observations play an important role in understanding a wide range of natural phenomena, ranging from planetary formation to cloud interactions. That is, until now. In experiments conducted at the Omega Laser...

Just how big was the 2020 Beirut explosion?

Oct. 6, 2021- 
On Aug. 4, 2020, one of the largest non-nuclear explosions in history pulverized a Beirut port and damaged more than half the city. The explosion resulted from the detonation of tons of ammonium nitrate, a combustible chemical compound commonly used in agriculture as a high-nitrate fertilizer, but which can also be used to manufacture explosives. Since that time, the explosive yield...

Climate change in the Sierra Nevada has profoundly altered its lake ecosystems

Oct. 5, 2021- 
Climate change has significantly impacted the natural systems of the Sierra Nevada, including the mountain lakes that are an iconic part of California’s natural beauty. New research from a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientist and colleagues from the University of Kentucky (UK) and Indiana State University (ISU) shows that lake-sediment cores from a subalpine lake in...

Late-time small-body disruptions can protect the Earth

Oct. 5, 2021- 
If an asteroid is determined to be on an Earth-impacting trajectory, scientists typically want to stage a deflection, where the asteroid is gently nudged by a relatively small change in velocity, while keeping the bulk of the asteroid together. A kinetic impactor or a standoff nuclear explosion can achieve a deflection. However, if the warning time is too short to stage a successful...