News

New technique can detect biological, chemical and explosive agents

March 15, 2007- 
LIVERMORE, Calif. — Airplane passengers and baggage might be screened one day by a machine under development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) that can detect explosive, chemical and biological agents all at the same time. A team of LLNL researchers has conceptually proven that a three-in-one machine, or “universal point detection system,” can be achieved, said George...

Lab honored by the American Cancer Society

March 7, 2007- 
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is being recognized by the American Cancer Society with the Corporate Recognition Award for consistent outstanding charitable contributions and leading efforts in cancer awareness and research. American Cancer Society Regional Vice President John Lazar will present the award to LLNL Director George Miller at a ceremony on March 23 for Lab employees to...

LLNL's Saturday science lectures travel to the Central Valley

March 6, 2007- 
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s (LLNL) popular lecture series, “Science on Saturday” will be offered at locations in the Central Valley from March 17 through May 19. This year’s talks explore a wide range of topics, including diet and cancer, the energy crisis, DNA, astrophysics and biodefense. Each presentation in the series is aligned with the California Science Standards. The...

Joint statement on the Reliable Replacement Warhead Announcement

March 2, 2007- 
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) today issued the following statement: The Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) today announced an acquisition and development strategy for the Reliable Replacement Warhead (RRW.) The design by Lawrence Livermore National...

Lab's 'Science on Saturday' lecture series returns

Feb. 27, 2007- 
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s (LLNL) popular lecture series, “Science on Saturday,” returns March 3 and runs through March 31. This year’s talks explore a range of fascinating topics – star power, comets, carbon dating, the energy crisis, and hydrogen as an alternative fuel. Each presentation in the series is the collaboration of a Lab scientist and a science teacher and...

LLNL researchers review biodetection technologies

Feb. 27, 2007- 
LIVERMORE, Calif. — In an effort to detect biological threats quickly and accurately, a number of detection technologies have been developed. Researchers from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory review several of the latest technologies in the most recent issue (Issue 3, 2007), of the British journal “ The Analyst.” “It’s important to provide a summary of the latest technologies...

Lab extends Teller Scholarship Award to Tracy's top science students

Feb. 22, 2007- 
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will extend its prestigious Edward Teller Scholarship Award to students in the Tracy Unified School District. Already in place in the Livermore Valley Joint Unified School District, the awards were instituted in 2004, in honor of the late Dr. Teller, renowned physicist and Lab co-founder. The Laboratory presents the awards annually to two top...

Media Advisory: LLNL to celebrate 'Engineers Day'

Feb. 13, 2007- 
WHO : As part of "National Engineers Week," Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will host the annual "Engineers Day." More than 500 5th graders are expected to attend from 10 selected schools located in Livermore, Brentwood, Oakland, Danville, Pleasanton, San Leandro and San Ramon. WHAT : Students will participate in hands-on technical exhibits, meet a variety of engineers from...

An invitation: Learn about LLNL at the AAAS annual meeting

Feb. 13, 2007- 
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is participating as an exhibitor and providing a variety of speakers at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Feb. 16-19 in San Francisco. In addition to hosting an exhibit with videos, posters and brochures about the Laboratory’s cutting-edge research and development programs – such as the...

Girls to explore science and math careers at 'Expanding Your Horizons' conference

Jan. 24, 2007- 
"Dream, Imagine, Explore," the 28th annual Tri-Valley Expanding Your Horizons in Science and Math Conference, will be held Saturday, Feb. 24, at the AT&T Administrative Center in San Ramon.  The conference begins at 8:15 a.m. The daylong conference is held for young women, grades 6-12, from Dublin, Livermore, Pleasanton, San Ramon and Sunol school districts to increase interest and...

Twenty-two workers to graduate from Livermore Laboratory's apprentice program

Jan. 12, 2007- 
Twenty-two Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory employees will receive journeyman certification during a celebration hosted by the Chabot-Las Positas Community College District. The workers have completed a demanding four-year training program that qualifies them for journey-level crafts or machinist positions in the Lab’s Plant and Mechanical Engineering departments. They were selected...

Comet particles tell a new story about the birth of the solar system

Dec. 14, 2006- 
LIVERMORE, Calif. — Particulate materials captured from the comet Wild 2 have revealed new clues about the birth of our solar system. The findings counter some basic theories about how the solar nebular is gently collapsing inward to form the sun and the planets. The thousands of samples of dust gathered by the Stardust spacecraft mission tell a story of a comet that formed in the Kuiper...

Plant a tree and save the Earth?

Dec. 11, 2006- 
LIVERMORE, Calif. — Can planting a tree stop the sea level from rising, the ice caps from melting and hurricanes from intensifying? A new study says that it depends on where the trees are planted. It cautions that new forests in mid- to high-latitude locations could actually create a net warming. It also confirms the notion that planting more trees in tropical rainforests could help slow...

Researchers say rise in California temperatures likely to affect crops

Dec. 4, 2006- 
LIVERMORE, Calif. — Increasing temperatures in California during the next 45 years could negatively affect the amount of almonds, walnuts, oranges, avocados and table grapes that Americans put on their tables. According to new research in the journal Agricultural and Forest Meteorology , production losses in some of California’s most popular crops could be as high as 40 percent by mid...

Two LLNL researchers named AAAS fellows

Nov. 23, 2006- 
LIVERMORE, Calif. — Robert J. Budnitz and Karl van Bibber of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have been named fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Election as a fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers. This year’s AAAS Fellows will be announced in the AAAS News & Notes section of the Nov. 24 edition of the journal S...

2006 Gordon Bell prizes go to LLNL's BlueGene/L simulations

Nov. 16, 2006- 
TAMPA BAY, Fla. — A large-scale electronic structure simulation of the heavy metal molybdenum conducted on the world’s fastest supercomputer, BlueGene/L, today earned a team led by a former and current Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists the 2006 Gordon Bell Prize for "peak performance." Three teams were selected from six finalists for Gordon Bell Prizes in two...

New director named at University of California's Edward Teller Education Center

Nov. 14, 2006- 
The University of California’s Edward Teller Education Center (ETEC) in Livermore has a new director, Carey Kopay of Lincoln, Calif. Kopay assumed leadership from ETEC’s first director, Stan Hitomi, on Oct. 30. Kopay received a master’s degree in biology from the University of California, Santa Barbara. She was the assistant director of the University of California, Davis Biotechnology...

Scientists capture nanoscale images with short, intense X-ray laser

Nov. 12, 2006- 
LIVERMORE, Calif. — Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists for the first time have validated the idea of using extremely short and intense X-ray pulses to capture images of objects such as proteins before the X-rays destroy the sample. At the same time, the team also established a speed record of 25 femtoseconds for flash imaging. The new method will be applicable to...

Scientists crack open stellar evolution New code reconciles discrepancies with the Big Bang

Oct. 26, 2006- 
LIVERMORE, Calif. – Using 3D models run on some of the fastest computers in the world, Laboratory physicists have created a mathematical code that cracks a mystery surrounding stellar evolution. For years, physicists have theorized that low-mass stars (about one to two times the size of our sun) produce great amounts of helium 3 (³He). When they exhaust the hydrogen in their cores to...

Genomic comparison of lactic acid bacteria published Zesty microbes enliven the palate and provide better blueprint for biofuels and specialtychemical production

Oct. 17, 2006- 
WALNUT CREEK, CA—With public concerns at a fevered pitch over the bacterial contamination of spinach, it is easy to lose track of how bland and deprived our world would be without the contribution to our food supply of such benign microbial players as lactic acid-producing bacteria. Researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI) and the  University of...