Lab leads new effort in materials development

Sept. 19, 2017- 
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will be part of a multi-lab effort to apply high-performance computing to U.S.-based industry’s discovery, design and development of materials for severe environments under a new initiative announced today by the Department of Energy (DOE). The High Performance Computing for Materials Program (HPC4Mtls) will connect industry with the world-class...

Lawrence Livermore scientist installed president of Minerals, Metals and Materials Society

April 7, 2015- 
Patrice Turchi of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was recently installed as the 2015 president of The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society (TMS) during the organization’s annual meeting in March.Turchi, who is group leader of the LLNL Material Science Division’s Advanced Metallurgical Science and Engineering group, has been an active member of TMS for more than 25 years. He has served...

Albright named president and CEO of HRL, Laboratories LLC

Oct. 20, 2014- 
Parney Albright, former director of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, has been named the president and chief executive officer of HRL Laboratories, LLC. He takes over the job formerly occupied by William Jeffrey on Nov. 3. HRL is a commercial research and development center focused on advanced microelectronics, information and systems sciences, materials, sensors and photonics, among...

Livermore researchers create engineered energy absorbing material

Aug. 20, 2014- 
Materials like solid gels and porous foams are used for padding and cushioning, but each has its own advantages and limitations. Gels are effective as padding but are relatively heavy; gel performance can also be affected by temperature, and possesses a limited range of compression due to a lack of porosity. Foams are lighter and more compressible, but their performance is not consistent due...

Lawrence Livermore, MIT researchers develop new ultralight, ultrastiff 3D printed materials

June 19, 2014- 
LIVERMORE, Calif. - Imagine a material with the same weight and density as aerogel -- a material so light it's called 'frozen smoke' -- but with 10,000 times more stiffness. This material could have a profound impact on the aerospace and automotive industries as well as other applications where lightweight, high-stiffness and high-strength materials are needed.Lawrence Livermore National...