Scientists discover ideal material for smart windows that convert sunlight to electricity

Jan. 30, 2018- 
Imagine a smart window that becomes transparent when it is dark or cool but darkens when the sun is bright, converting that sunlight into electricity. Typical smart windows absorb or reflect sunlight without actually converting the solar energy into a useful form. However, the new photovoltaic windows would convert the sunlight on bright days into energy that provides more functional...

Lab earns DOE grant for collaboration to improve growth, efficiency of biofuel-producing algae

Jan. 29, 2018- 
The Department of Energy has awarded Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) a three-year, $1.5 million grant to improve the growth and efficiency of biofuel-producing algae through the alteration of their microbiomes. The work, which is led at LLNL by Xavier Mayali and Ty Samo in the Physics and Life Sciences Directorate, will be done in collaboration with the San Francisco startup...

Alan Hidy's global travels lead to a CAMS career

Jan. 22, 2018- 
The bookcase in Alan Hidy’s office is loaded with carefully labeled bags of rocks -- some the size of a fist, others pulverized into dust. The granite in these bags is destined for isotope ratio measurement at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS). "These are from the Sierras," Hidy said, referring to his ongoing study of glaciation high in...

Looking to the sun to create hydrogen fuel

Jan. 17, 2018- 
When Lawrence Livermore scientist Tadashi Ogitsu leased a hydrogen fuel-cell car in 2017, he knew that his daily commute would change forever. There are no greenhouse gases that come out of the tailpipe,  just a bit of water vapor. The market for hydrogen cars is growing. According to a recent report by the California Energy Commission and the California Air Resources Board, the state is now...

Meteorites reveal story of Martian climate

Jan. 9, 2018- 
Liquid water is not stable on Mars’ surface because the planet’s atmosphere is too thin and temperatures are too cold. However, at one time Mars hosted a warm and wet surface environment that may have been conducive to life. A significant unanswered question in planetary science is when Mars underwent this dramatic change in climate conditions. New research by Lawrence Livermore National...

Newly developed tunable, green detergents could be 'made-to-order' for industry

Jan. 2, 2018- 
That mascara that your colleague is wearing may contain components from a microorganism. Detergents, also known as surfactants, are used extensively in the cosmetics, oil, food, agriculture, healthcare and pharmaceutical industries. Their sales are projected to reach $42 billion by 2020. The majority of surfactants are petrochemicals, i.e. are synthesized from petroleum compounds. They...

Project to study climate effects on California water systems from headwaters to groundwater

Dec. 28, 2017- 
To address future climate change effects on water resources, scientists at five UC campuses, and Lawrence Livermore and Lawrence Berkeley national laboratories will study California’s water systems, from the headwaters in the Sierra Nevada, through rivers, reservoirs and groundwater in the Central Valley. The "Headwaters to groundwate resources in a changing climate" project recently...

LLNL nanolipoprotein technology licensed

Dec. 21, 2017- 
A Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) biomedical technology that can deliver vaccines and drugs inside the human body has been licensed for use in cancer treatments to a Michigan company. The Livermore-developed technology, using nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs), has been licensed to Ann Arbor-based EVOQ Therapeutics for cancer immunotherapy, which deploys the body’s own immune...

'Brain-on-a-chip' tests effects of biological and chemical agents, develop countermeasures

Dec. 18, 2017- 
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists and engineers have developed a "brain-on-a-chip" device aimed at testing and predicting the effects of biological and chemical agents, disease or pharmaceutical drugs on the brain over time without the need for human or animal subjects. The device, part of the Lab’s iCHIP (in-vitro Chip-Based Human Investigational Platform) project...

LLNL-developed microelectrodes enable automated sorting of neural signals

Dec. 12, 2017- 
Thin-film microelectrode arrays produced at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have enabled development of an automated system to sort brain activity by individual neurons, a technology that could open the door to recording and analyzing unprecedented amounts of neural signals over time, and, ultimately, provide scientists with new clues about how the brain learns and communicates...

Arctic sea ice loss could dry out California

Dec. 5, 2017- 
Arctic sea ice loss of the magnitude expected in the next few decades could impact California’s rainfall and exacerbate future droughts, according to new research led by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists. The dramatic loss of Arctic sea ice cover observed over the satellite era is expected to continue throughout the 21st century. Over the next few decades, the Arctic...

New study verifies more paths to survival for endangered winter-run Chinook salmon

Dec. 4, 2017- 
The most treacherous journey of any salmon’s life is from its natal river to the ocean when it is still a juvenile, usually when they are only a few months old. For endangered salmon, this early journey is a matter of life and death for the whole population. In a new study from the Metropolitan Water District (MWD), University of California, Davis, the NOAA Fisheries Service and Lawrence...

Clay mineral waters Earth's mantle from inside

Dec. 1, 2017- 
The first observation of a super-hydrated phase of the clay mineral kaolinite could improve the understanding of processes that lead to volcanism and affect earthquakes. In high-pressure and high-temperature X-ray measurements, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientist Hyunchae Cynn and colleagues from Yonsei University in the Republic of Korea, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY)...

First forms of life on Earth unveiled in hot spring

Nov. 28, 2017- 
Terrestrial geothermal systems are like buried treasure when it comes to finding out the origins of life on Earth. In these underground hot springs, some of the most ancient single-celled bacteria and archaea live the life of extremophiles (organisms that live under extreme environmental conditions such as hot springs or ice caps). By their makeup alone, the microorganisms may reflect the...

Lawrence Livermore and American Heart Association partner to accelerate drug discovery

Nov. 15, 2017- 
The American Heart Association (AHA) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have formed a strategic business partnership to overcome the burden of drug discovery, cost and access.  The two organizations will leverage the world’s most powerful supercomputers to accelerate drug discovery. LLNL scientists and engineers in collaboration with AHA-funded scientists will create a...

Lab employees selected as 2017 APS fellows

Oct. 31, 2017- 
Three Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists -- Nathan Barton, Lab Director William Goldstein and Robert Kirkwood -- have been selected as 2017 fellows of the American Physical Society (APS). Election to APS fellowship recognizes the society member's exceptional contributions to the field of physics through research, leadership, applications of physics or contributions to...

Public-private consortium aims to cut preclinical cancer drug discovery from six years to just one

Oct. 27, 2017- 
Lawrence Livermore National Lab, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, GSK and University of California, San Francisco will combine vast data stores, supercomputing and scientific expertise to reinvent discovery process for cancer medicines. SAN FRANCISCO, Oct 27, 2017 -- Scientists from two U.S. national laboratories, industry and academia today launched an unprecedented effort...

LLNL researchers turn to bioengineered bacteria to increase U.S. supply of rare earth metals

Oct. 23, 2017- 
To help increase the U.S. supply of rare earth metals, a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) team has created a new way to recover rare earths using bioengineered bacteria. Rare earth elements (REEs) are essential for American competitiveness in the clean energy industry because they are used in many devices important to a high-tech economy and national security, including computer...

Exascale in motion on earthquake risks

Oct. 12, 2017- 
Assessing large magnitude (greater than 6 on the Richter scale) earthquake hazards on a regional (up to 100 kilometers) scale takes big machines. To resolve the frequencies important to engineering analysis of the built environment (up to 10 Hz or higher), numerical simulations of earthquake motions must be done on today’s most powerful computers.   The algorithms and codes that run on today...

Big, bad, Martian volcanoes unveiled

Oct. 10, 2017- 
They are bigger, scarier and last longer. That’s the conclusion of a team of scientists, including Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory cosmochemist Bill Cassata, about the evolution of volcanoes on the red planet, compared to those on Earth. Martian volcanoes are the largest in the solar system. Although their size indicates continued activity over billions of years, their formation...