Going beyond Mother Nature’s molecules to target radioactive metals

May 16, 2022- 
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists and collaborators at Penn State University are improving natural molecules that would help target specific radioactive elements that are found in nuclear waste or used in nuclear medicine. Even the most effective molecules found in nature, which underwent billions of years of evolution, can still be improved for non-natural...

With better algal forecasts comes safer water

May 9, 2022- 
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists and collaborators have used a new technique to better forecast the level of algal toxins that accumulate in Lake Erie every year. Harmful algal blooms (HABs) are global phenomena and, in freshwater lakes and reservoirs, are caused by cyanobacteria of the genus Microcystis that produce microcystins, a suite of amino-acid-like toxins...

Laser-based ultrasound detects defect-producing features in metal 3D printing

April 28, 2022- 
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers have developed a new all-optical ultrasound technique capable of performing on-demand characterization of melt tracks and detecting formation of defects in a popular metal 3D printing process. In a paper published by Scientific Reports, Lab researchers propose a diagnostic using surface acoustic waves (SAW), generated by laser...

LLNL partners with city of Livermore to reduce carbon emissions

April 25, 2022- 
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the city of Livermore to collaborate on advancing climate action in Livermore and build community-wide resilience to climate change impacts. The city’s Climate Action Plan (CAP), anticipated to be adopted by the Livermore City Council this summer, will create a roadmap to achieve carbon...

Speeding up detection of climate change response to emission reductions

April 14, 2022- 
If humans decrease their greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere, how quickly would we detect a slowdown in global warming? In a recent study published in Nature Communications, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) climate scientist Mark Zelinka and collaborators developed a novel approach to more quickly see the temperature response to strong emissions reductions. “Global...

Hydrogen storage reactions reveal a complex dance toward faster uptake

March 30, 2022- 
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists have simulated the hydrogen storage reactions in a promising material and discovered why hydrogen uptake slows as the material absorbs hydrogen, providing insight that could be used for improvements. Improving hydrogen storage in solid-state materials depends on a better understanding of multistep chemical reactions that take...

White House summit celebrates fusion milestones, discusses 'bold' 10-year plan for commercialization

March 28, 2022- 
Recent scientific advancements in fusion, combined with increasing private investments and the urgent need to address climate change, mean the “time is now” for accelerating fusion energy commercialization, fusion experts said at a White House summit on March 17. Hosted by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the first...

Paving the way to tailor-made carbon nanomaterials and more accurate energetic materials modeling

March 17, 2022- 
Carbon exhibits a remarkable tendency to form nanomaterials with unusual physical and chemical properties, arising from its ability to engage in different bonding states. Many of these “next-generation” nanomaterials, which include nanodiamonds, nanographite, amorphous nanocarbon and nano-onions, are currently being studied for possible applications spanning quantum computing to bio-imaging...

LLNL study on tumor/immune cell interaction could impact cancer immunotherapies

March 16, 2022- 
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists exploring the interaction between cancer cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM) — the “scaffolding” of organs — found that proteins in the ECM can dramatically impact the immune system’s ability to kill tumors. Researchers said the findings, published online in the journal Biomaterials, could represent a novel approach to studying...

Holographic plasma lenses for ultra-high-power lasers

March 14, 2022- 
In the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world’s highest-energy laser system, a complex series of glass optics — including amplifiers, mirrors, wavelength converters and focusing lenses — strengthens and guides the laser light to its destination. Over the years, researchers have developed and refined these optics so they can withstand the intense energies generated by NIF’s powerful laser...

LLNL constructing high-power laser for new experimental facility at SLAC

March 11, 2022- 
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s decades of leadership in developing high-energy lasers is being tapped to provide a key component of a major upgrade to SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory’s Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Over the next several years, LLNL’s Advanced Photon Technologies (APT) program will design and construct one of the world’s most powerful petawatt...

Machine learning model finds COVID-19 risks for cancer patients

March 10, 2022- 
If a cancer patient tests positive for COVID-19, are they more likely to become hospitalized from the disease? That depends on certain risk factors, according to a new study by researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), who looked to identify cancer-related risks for poor outcomes from COVID-19. Analyzing one of the...

NIF helps unravel mysteries of heat conduction in galaxy clusters

March 9, 2022- 
An international team led by scientists from the University of Oxford Department of Physics, the University of Rochester and the University of Chicago turned to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s (LLNL’s) National Ignition Facility (NIF) to help unravel the inner workings of heat conduction in clusters of galaxies — the largest structures in the universe. These clusters are made of...

Dead or alive: microorganisms in soil shape the global carbon cycle

March 3, 2022- 
Whether dead or alive, soil microorganisms play a major role in the biogeochemical cycling of carbon in the terrestrial biosphere. But what is the specific role of death for the bacteria, fungi and microfauna that make up the soil microbiome? That is the topic of a new review by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists and collaborators. The article, appearing in Nature...

Study finds new biomarkers that could assist in identifying deep-space flight risks

March 2, 2022- 
An international team of scientists has found new biomarkers that can be used for diagnostic purposes and potentially as predictive tools of the risks associated with deep-space flight. In their study, the team, including three researchers from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), examined approximately two-decade-old blood samples from space shuttle astronauts before and after...

Understanding hot-spot conditions in experiments at the National Ignition Facility

March 1, 2022- 
Research conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) describes a validation exercise for simple models used to understand hot-spot conditions reached in an implosion, which find good agreement when compared to a set of simulations. Progress toward ignition requires accurately diagnosing current conditions and assessing proximity metrics for implosion experiments at LLNL...

Lawrence Livermore shares recommendations for Microsoft to reach carbon-negative goal

Feb. 28, 2022- 
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists have provided input on Microsoft’s pathway to become carbon-negative by 2030. LLNL researchers built on their pivotal report "Getting to Neutral: Options for Negative Carbon Emissions in California," which has become a trusted adviser in the discussion of how to remove carbon dioxide from the air, to make recommendations to...

Putting the pedal to the metal crossing the solid-liquid interface

Feb. 24, 2022- 
Most metal alloys are prone to corrosion, which costs hundreds of billions of dollars of damage annually in the U.S. alone. Accurately predicting corrosion rates is a long-standing goal of corrosion science, but these rates depend strongly on the specific operating environment. At the atomic scale, these environmental factors are associated with how quickly and easily metal ions dissolve and...

Where on Earth did the water come from?

Feb. 14, 2022- 
Earth’s supply of water is incredibly important for its ability to sustain life, but where did that water come from? Was it present when Earth formed or was it delivered later by meteorites or comets from outer space? The source of Earth’s water has been a longstanding debate and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists think they have the answer — and they found it by...

Green, bio-based extraction of rare earths from domestic ores for a sustainable world

Feb. 10, 2022- 
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Penn State (PSU) and University of Arizona (UA) researchers are partnering with industry collaborator Western Rare Earths (WRE), U.S. subsidiary of American Rare Earths Limited, to use a naturally occurring protein to extract and purify rare earth elements (REEs) from abundant, domestic ore-based feedstocks and waste materials without harming the...