Director honors R&D 100 award winners


Photos by Michael Anthony/LLNL
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R&D

The LEOPARD (Laser Energy Optimization by Precision Adjustments to the Radiant Distribution) technology has been developed to enhance the operability of laser facilities. Shown are members of the team (left to right), who are joined by Director of Economic Development Buck Koonce (second from the left) and Deputy Director for Science and Technology Bill Goldstein and Director Parney Albright (at the far right). Mike Taranowski, Koonce, Matt Rever, Mark Miller, Jean Michel DiNicola, Jeff Wilburn, Eddy Tse, Kevin Williams, Jeff Jarboe, Michael Borden, John Heebner, Ed Marley, Steve Hunter, Nan Wong, Mark Franks, Mike Scanlan, Phil Miller, Abdul Awwal, Gordon Brunton, Marcus Monticelli, Eric Imhoff, Kim Christensen, Goldstein, and Albright. Four team members -- Sham Dixit, Lynn Seppala, Tracy Budge and Larry Smith –
were not in the photo.

R&D

The Snowflake Power Divertor helps solve a key problem for commercial tokamaks by distributing the hot plasma exhaust of hundreds of megawatts over a sufficiently large wall surface area. Developed in conjunction with researchers from the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and the Center for Research in Plasma Physics in Switzerland, it uses a previously unknown configuration of the divertor magnetic field whose shape is reminiscent of a snowflake. Shown left to right are LLNL team members Tom Rognlien, Dmitri Ryutov and Maxim Umansky, along with Director for Economic Development Buck Koonce, Deputy Director for Science and Technology Bill Goldstein and Director Parney Albright. Not shown in the photo are team members Vlad Soukhanovskii and Ron Cohen.

 

R&D

High Velocity Laser Accelerated Deposition (HVLAD) is a new photonic method for producing protective coatings with ultra-high-strength, explosively bonded interfaces. The process was developed by Lab researchers Alexander Rubenchik (center) and Joseph Farmer (right) with help from Livermore-based Metal Improvement Co. Inc., which was represented by Lloyd Hackel, left.

 

 

 

 

 

R&D

A team of LLNL researchers has developed the first plastic material capable of efficiently distinguishing neutrons from gamma rays, something not thought possible for the past five decades or so. Shown from left to right are team members Keith Lewis, Paul Martinez, Leslie Carman, Sebastien Hamel, Natalia Zaitseva and Andrew Glenn, along with Director for Economic Development Buck Koonce, Deputy Director for Science and Technology Bill Goldstein and Director Parney Albright. Not shown in the photo are team members Steve Payne, Nerine Cherepy, Benjamin Rupert, Iwona Pawelczak and Michelle Faust.

R&D

Laboratory Director Parney Albright presented the 2012 R&D 100 awards to LLNL scientists and engineers on March 28 and hosted a reception for the recipients.

 

 

 

 

R&D

LLNL's Frank Wong is part of a team, including Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Bridgeville, Pa.-based Carpenter Technology Corp. and the Colorado School of Mines, that has developed a new coating that is as hard as tungsten carbide-cobalt composites – at half the price.