Lawrence Livermore to work on DOE research program for electric grid modernization

Jan. 14, 2016
grid

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers will be working on 14 new grid research projects as part of the Grid Modernization Laboratory Consortium. (Download Image)

Lawrence Livermore to work on DOE research program for electric grid modernization

Anne M Stark, stark8@llnl.gov, 925-422-9799

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers will be working on 14 new grid research projects as part of the Grid Modernization Laboratory Consortium announced Thursday by Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz.

Moniz released a blueprint for modernizing the grid, which is built on its Grid Modernization Initiative, an ongoing effort that reflects the Obama Administration’s commitment to improving the resiliency, reliability and security of the nation’s electricity delivery system. 

The Grid Modernization Initiative represents a comprehensive Department of Energy (DOE) effort to help shape the future of the nation’s grid and solve the challenges of integrating conventional and renewable sources with energy storage and smart buildings, while ensuring that the grid is resilient and secure to withstand growing cybersecurity and climate challenges.

“This is an exciting opportunity for LLNL to apply its capabilities in computing and engineering for building the next generation of modeling and analysis tools for improving grid resilience and providing for clean energy to the state of California and the nation,” said John Grosh, LLNL’s deputy associate director for Computation. 

This national research program also is focused on addressing local grid needs. LLNL is participating on a project to develop software tools to best site distributed energy resources such as rooftop solar. Local partners include Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the California Public Utility Commission. 

Find more information on the Grid Modernization Initiative and on the selected national lab partnership projects.