03/05/2012

Lab co-sponsors North Dakota energy technology symposium

Donald B Johnston, LLNL, (925) 423-4902, johnston19@llnl.gov



Tomás Díaz de la Rubia

Tomás Díaz de la Rubia, the Lab's deputy director for Science and Technology, discussed Monday how high performance computer modeling and simulation can accelerate the development of clean energy technologies in a keynote address at North Dakota State University (NDSU) in Fargo, N.D.

The Laboratory was a co-sponsor of the "North Dakota Energy Symposium: Using Technology to Enhance Clean Energy Production" with the Howard Baker Forum and North Dakota State University. The symposium was hosted by Sen. John Hoeven of North Dakota.

EmPower ND, North Dakota's comprehensive energy policy, provided the framework for the symposium, which brought together energy experts from academia as well as government and industry. Discussion centered on opportunities and challenges in current methods of energy production and how high performance computing (HPC) modeling and simulation can advance those methods.


U.S. Sen. John Hoeven

The potential benefits of HPC modeling and simulation focused on three sectors of North Dakota's energy policy: oil and gas production; wind energy; and the transmission of electrical power. The goal was to identify near-term opportunities in government and industry to accelerate energy technology development.

The event also showcased HPC capabilities resident at the national labs and North Dakota State University's Center for Computationally-Assisted Science and Technology.

LLNL scientists participating in panel discussions included: Julio Friedmann, LLNL chief energy technologist; Steve Bohlen, deputy program director; and Nalu Kaahaaina of the Zero Carbon Energy Program.

The symposium was a follow up to the National Summit on Advancing Clean Energy Technology, held in Washington, D.C. in May 2011 and organized by the Howard Baker Forum, the Bipartisan Policy Center and LLNL. Hoeven was a keynote speaker at the summit.

Joining LLNL and NDSU at the symposium were representatives from the North Dakota Department of Mineral Resources, LM Wind Power Blades, Xcel Energy, Siemens Energy and QEP Resources.



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